EXPRESSIVE ARTS THERAPY  (EAT)

Expressive Arts Therapy - Wellness Path

WELLNESS PATH – ARTS

Expressive Arts Therapy

can put you on a path to wellness!

 

info@bagwellness.com

616-379-WELL

*Music Therapy

Drama Therapy

Narrative Therapy

Cinematherapy

Biblio, Literary & Poetry Therapy

Art Therapy

Dance Therapy

*Humor Therapy

Expressive Arts Therapy (EAT) allows you to heal yourself using a form of art that is most appealing to you. The end result is not as important as the creative process. It is the creative process that helps you begin to heal from grief, heartache, loneliness, boredom, troublesome thoughts, and more. EAT can help you build confidence and improve self-esteem. Read the brief descriptions of a few of the EAT modalities that can put you on a path to wellness.

The American Music Therapy Association states music therapy interventions can promote wellness, enhance memory, promote physical rehabilitation, manage stress, and more.

Biblio, Literary, and Poetry Therapy are forms of therapy that utilize language arts to stimulate cognition, release stress, and employ creativity with writing, storytelling, reading, and poetry. Poetry Therapy dates back to the 100 A.D. era when the Greek physician, Soranus was credited with using poetry to help mentally challenged patients.

Narrative Therapy is beneficial in helping to recreate stories and identities that allow people to think differently about their values, skills, and beliefs. This helps people learn how to externalize their problems as they rebuild an improved identity.

According to the American Dance Therapy Association (ADTA), dance/movement therapy is the psychotherapeutic use of movement to promote emotional, social, cognitive and physical integration. Dance/movement therapy is practiced in mental health, rehabilitation, medical, educational and forensic settings.

The Association for Applied and Therapeutic Humor (AATH) provides education, resources and a supportive community to psychologists, counselors, healthcare practitioners, nurses, social workers, physicians, and educators and other professionals who use humor as an intervention to enhance health, treat illness and facilitate physical, emotional, cognitive, and spiritual healing. Humor seems to help diminish depression, insomnia, and loneliness. It can help improve self-esteem and is described as an effective defense mechanism in helping a person distance themselves from distressful people and situations.